Number of entries: 144
Number of pages: 15

<< First  |  < Prev  |  6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15  |  Next >  |  Last >>

Submitted by Comments:
Name: DWM
From: Stamford, CT
E-mail: Contact
I've visited a few times and thought that it was about time I signed the guestbook.
 
Added: May 25, 2011 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Roselyn
From: England
E-mail: Contact
Thank you for the information here
It has made a lot of sense.
keep up the good work.
 
Added: May 15, 2011 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: David M
From: Calgary
E-mail: Contact
Seeking information on north American and Australian dragons for my children's book.Preferred, from earliest aboriginals from both continents. Also seeking the most ancient word for water known to man. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
Added: May 12, 2011 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Mary
From: Maine
E-mail: Contact
I am just starting to find out about dragons, and they are better than some of the fairies, etc. that I read about and believe in. Keep on adding information.
 
Added: April 29, 2011 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: kayla
i find dragons amazing
 
Added: April 7, 2011 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: ScientificDragonologist
Several means have been proposed by which dragons could breathe fire. The first was displayed on the show "Dragons: a Fantasy Made Real," in which bacteria in the gut produced hydrogen. This hydrogen was used(quite infeisibly, as you have correctly observed elsewhere) for flotation and for fuel. It was ignited by ground platinum, which was used as a catalyst.
However, I see several problems with this scenario. The first is that no bacteria of which I am aware produces hydrogen gas. Instead, gut bugs tend to produce methane. So either the dragon would have to use methane as a fuel, or it would have to convert it into hydrogen. Assuming the latter, there are several pathways that would be open. One of which would be simply CH4 => 2 H2 + C. In this case, methane is converted into hydrogen gas and graphite. The other would be CH4 + 2 H2O => CO2 + 4 H2. Water and methane are used to make carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas. Either way, you get hydrogen.
The other problem with the "Dragons: a Fantasy Made Real" dragon is the catalyist used: ground platinum. There are several problems with using platinum as a catalyst. The first is its rairity. The ability of a dragon to get platinum to grind up would be quite limited. The other is the fact that if the platinum is wet or not finely ground enough, it won't catalyze the reaction. As an alternative "starter," I suggest that the dragon would have two bones. One of them would have iron deposited on it, the other would have silica(as in quartz crystals) deposited on it. Since flint is simply over-glorified quartz, the dragon would be able to ignite its inferno simply by flexing a muscle in its mouth and causing the two bones to hit eachother. The result would be tiny pieces of iron flying off and igniting on contact with the air. Sparks. These sparks in turn ignite the hydrogen gas, and you have fire-breathing.

The other method, the one of which I am more fond, would be a bombardier beetle sort of layout. A flameable chemical cocktail would be produced in an organ unique to dragons. When the dragon breathes fire, this cocktail is sent to the mouth, where a resevoir in the sinuses releases a catalyst into the spray. The addition of this catalyst causes the flameable spray to ignite, and the dragon breathes fire. However, this sort of layout would reduce the dragon's sense of smell, as the nasal pasages and sinuses once used for that very purpose have been partially or completely replaced by the resevoir. This would explain the origen of the word dragon, which comes from a greek work relating to keen eyesight, as an animal with a diminished sense of smell would have to rely increasingly on eyesight as its primary sensory input.
 
Added: April 6, 2011 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Peggy
From: UK/US
I am delighted with these dragons. I would wish to see my own dragon..Y Drai Goch..the Welsh Dragon of Wales. It appears on the National Flag of Wales. Very brave sight.
 
Added: April 2, 2011 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Akasha
From: SLC, UT
E-mail: Contact
This site was awesome it answered all my questions.
 
Added: March 20, 2011 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: aurora
From: karachi
this is a gud,informative site,,,im fond of mythical creatures,esp dragons and elves...i hope i can find site like these on chupacabra also...the myths, theories and all..but overall i like this site,,gud work..
 
Added: February 19, 2011 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Kadence
From: Ohio
E-mail: Contact
This website is AMAZING. The info was accurate and I was able to see artwork I never would have come across if it weren't for your website. Kylie, you have an amazing portfolio and you can bet you will be seeing more of me. I garuntee it!
 
Added: February 18, 2011 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  

<< First  |  < Prev  |  6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15  |  Next >  |  Last >>

 
 
 
 
 
 
Separator

Powered by PHP guestbook 1.6 from PHPJunkyard - Free PHP scripts

Guestbook SPAM? Stop it!